Well-being checklist

Sometimes when we are struggling, it's hard to step back and get a clear look at how we are doing. Here are questions you can ask yourself to help you get a picture of what's going on with you.
If you find that you are agreeing with some or many of these statements, you may want to visit your doctor to help you figure out what's going on. You can take this sheet with you to help you talk to your doctor or therapist.

What's going on with my body?

I often feel exhausted, even early in the week.
I frequently feel dizzy or nauseous.
I have problems with digestion, such as stomach bloating, pain or gas.
I regularly experience diarrhea or constipation.
I have no appetite, or I'm overeating.
I frequently have muscle, joint, headache or chest pain.
I'm craving junk food.
I'm finding it hard to maintain a reasonable weight.
I'm having trouble sleeping well or I am sleeping all the time.
I do not feel rested when I get up in the morning.

What's going on with my emotions?

I frequently feel anxious or upset.
I feel like crying all the time.
I am very fearful.
I often feel tense at work.
I often feel guilty about letting my team down.
I feel angry when someone makes a mistake.
I feel angry or upset when someone points out a mistake I've made.
I lack confidence in myself and the work that I do.
I'm finding it hard to remember what it feels like to be happy.
I keep my feelings bottled up inside.
I feel like I am never good enough.

What's going on with my thoughts?

I often feel I can't handle everything I have to do.
I feel like I have little or no control over my life.
I don't have patience the way I used to.
I frequently worry about work even when I'm not at work.
I spend a lot of time thinking about and complaining about the past.
I see people's faults and mistakes more than their strengths and contributions.
I see the negative things about myself more than the positive.
I often think that there is only one way to do something.

What's going on with my job?

I have difficulty concentrating at work.
I find it difficult to make decisions at work.
I seem to be disorganized at work.
I find it difficult to start tasks.
I find it difficult to read and remember what I've read.
I am finding tasks that used to be easy more difficult now.
I feel like I am a burden to the team.

What's going on with the people at work?

I don't think I'm being treated fairly at work.
I don't feel valued by a lot of the people I work with.
I'm finding it hard to rely on my co-workers.
I don't laugh with co-workers anymore.
I often say things in anger or frustration that I wish I could take back.
I seem to take things more seriously than my co-workers.
I'm tired of hearing other people's problems.
I feel like I am letting everyone down.
I am becoming dependent on one person at work that I feel safe with.
I'm withdrawing from people at work.
I'm afraid that others will realize my work is not good enough.

What's going on with my behaviour?

I lose my temper at work.
I no longer want to be around people.
I don't understand why I can't get my work done.
I find I'm playing computer games when I'm supposed to be working.
I'm using sleeping pills more than I used to.
I'm drinking more alcohol than I used to.
I'm spending money or gambling more than I used to.
I'm using prescription or recreational drugs more than I used to.
I use coffee, alcohol or drugs to help me get through the day.
I find it difficult to relax.
I sit at work and feel frozen, unable to do anything.
I cannot make sense of what I am reading anymore.
I cannot produce my work the way I used to.
One moment I am smiling and the next moment I am crying.

If your answers are causing you concern, consider taking this list to your doctor or therapist.

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The contents of these resources are offered for information purposes only. Every situation is different and you should consider your own circumstances before making decisions about employment and treatment options. These resources are not intended to offer legal, medical or other professional advice and should not be relied on as such.

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Funded through The Great-West Life Assurance Company's national corporate citizenship program in support of the Great-West Life Centre for Mental Health in the Workplace.